Physician Directory
Short Bio

James  Kneller

Name and Degree:
James Kneller, BSE,MD,MSc,PhD
Position:
Postdoctoral Clinical Fellow
Background Information
PhD Pharmacology - Mechanisms of atrial fibrillation and antiarrhythmic drug therapy evaluated by mathematical modeling.

MSc Bioengineering - cardiovascular biomechanics.

BSE Mechanical Engieering - special interest in machine design, kinematics, finite element modeling.



Education and Training
Undergraduate:

 1990-1995 , Mechanical Engineering, Walla Walla College

Graduate:

 1999-2002 , Pharmacology, McGill University

Medical School:

 1997-2004 , Medicine, McGill University

Internship:

 2004-2005 , Internal medicine, McGill University Health Center

Residency:

 2005-2007 , Internal medicine, McGill University Health Center

Post-Graduate:

 2007-2011 , Cardiology, Columbia University Medical Center

Board Certification: Internal medicine
Clinical Interests:
Cardiology,Complex arrhythmia dynamics
Research Interests:
Dr. James Kneller graduated magna cum laude with a BSc in Mechanical Engineering from Walla Walla College in southeastern Washington in 1995. He then completed a MSc in Bioengineering at the University of Pittsburgh in 1997. Dr. Kneller's master's thesis was conducted with Dr. Harvey Borovetz, in association with the cardiac catheterization laboratory at Pitt, and represented some of the earliest work in the delivery of drug therapy from intracoronary stents. In 2004, Dr. Kneller graduated with honors from the combined MD, PhD program at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. His doctoral dissertation was titled "Mechanisms of atrial fibrillation and antiarrhythmic drug therapy evaluated by mathematical modeling." While Dr. Kneller's dissertation consisted of four published manuscripts, the most important contributions were likely from the final two papers entitled: “Cholinergic atrial fibrillation in a computer model of a 2-dimensional sheet of canine atrial cells with realistic ionic properties (Circ Res. 2002),” followed by “Mechanisms of atrial fibrillation termination by pure sodium channel blockade in an ionically-realistic mathematical model (Circ Res. 2005)." In these studies, Dr. Kneller developed the first mathematical model of a sustained arrhythmia, and subsequently used the model to solve the mechanism of atrial fibrillation termination by class I antiarrhythmic drugs, which to date have been both the most successful, but also the most poorly understood class of AF-terminating drug in clinical practice. Presently Dr. Kneller has authored 15 peer-reviewed manuscripts, and his work has been cited over 290 times. Dr. Kneller remained at McGill for internal medicine residency (2004-07), and is presently a clinical fellow in Cardiology at the Columbia University Medical Center in New York. His present research interest includes optical mapping of arrhythmia dynamics in large animal models, in combination with ongoing development of associated mathematical models.
Mentor(s):
Dr. Stanley Nattel, Director of Research, Montreal Heart Institute, McGill University Department of Pharmacology, Montreal QC Canada

Dr. Harvey Borovetz, Chair, Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

Abstracts:
Publications:
1. Kneller J, Kalifa J, Zou R, Zaitsev AV, Warren M, Berenfeld O, Vigmond EJ, Leon LJ, Nattel S, Jalife J.: Mechanisms of atrial fibrillation termination by pure sodium channel blockade in an ionically-realistic mathematical model.  Circ Res  2005;96: e35-47

2. Kneller J, Zou R, Vigmond EJ, Wang Z, Leon LJ, Nattel S.: Cholinergic atrial fibrillation in a computer model of a 2-dimensional sheet of canine atrial cells with realistic ionic properties.  Circ Res  2002;90: e73-87

3. Kneller J, Ramirez RJ, Chartier D, Courtemanche M, Nattel S.: Time-dependent transients in an ionically-based mathematical model of the canine atrial action potential.  Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol  2002;282: H1437-51

4. Zou R, Kneller J, Leon JL, Nattel S: Substrate size as a determinant of fibrillatory activity maintenance in a mathematical model of canine atrium.  Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol  2005;289: H1002-12

5. Kneller J, Sun H, Leblanc N, Nattel S: Remodeling of Ca(2+)-handling by atrial tachycardia: evidence for a role in loss of rate-adaptation.  Cardiovasc Res  2002;54: 416-26

6. Li D, Zhang L, Kneller J, Nattel S: Potential ionic mechanism for repolarization differences between canine right and left atrium.  Circ Res  2001;88: 1168-75



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